Showing posts with label Female musicians. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Female musicians. Show all posts

April 17, 2012

Hit So Hard - Documentary

I'll admit that I can get snarky about the number of people and subjects that now have a documentary about them and when I heard the drummer from the band Hole ( Patty Schemel) has done an autobiographical one, the eyes rolled back into my head. Then I watched the trailer and changed my mind.

I am interested in hearing any woman's story who has played in bands, no less one as infamous as Hole. The fact that she survived playing in one of the most infamously drinky (that's a word, right?) / druggy bands on the planet is also worth celebrating. Then it also appears that there is heavy dose of behind the scenes footage of Kurt Cobain. This highly personal look at Kurt will probably polarize Nirvana fans because some people will be hungry for any new looks at their Rock hero but then there is also the age old association of Courtney Love being a Yoko Ono figure who helped to run Kurt into the ground, literally.

I can't begin to wrap my head around what it was like to play in a band with Courtney Love no less how anyone could handle all of the drama and tragedy that came with her. Add in her own battle with addictions, her openly talking about her sexuality (being gay), and no matter what opinions you carry about the band, the human side of the story is a valuable one.

February 14, 2012

A Female Voice I Worshiped / Wished I Had Circa the '90s : Madder Rose

Madder Rose











January 26, 2012

Early '90s Flashback : An amazing band you probably never heard back in the day.

Earwig (UK band). There isn't a whole lot to be found about this band via the web but I did find this on YouTube:

"An air of mystery surrounds the indie trio Earwig and the few records they released from 1991 to 1992 on the small indie label La Di Da, based in their hometown of Hove, near Brighton, England. 

Earwig were Kirsty Yates,  Julian Tardo and Dimitri Voulis.

The band released three 12" EPs and an album titled "Under My Skin I am Laughing". The album - as well as the only single taken from it, "Everyday Shines" - received reasonably good reviews in both NME and Melodymaker. The band developed and refined a quite distinctive sound during it's existence by using both sequencers and electronics with more conventional instruments, to build introvert and claustrophobic pop songs about obsessive relationships and conflicting images of the self in an intimate personal drama."



What I personally know about them is this. In the early '90s I didn't relate to Riot Grrrl deeply and my female musician idols were not outwardly feminists but rather band members who happen to be female. (Lush, Jawbox, Superchunk, Velocity Girl, Scarce, Helium, MBV, and Swirlies to name a few examples)

A sales rep from Revolver Distribution back in the early '90s (I was working at a record store at the time). turned me on to Earwig and I managed to collect a few of their records during those brief years. Earwig never seemed to gain any real momentum with the masses and when I talk about favorite bands that feature women with music geeks, this is a group that few serious music nerds who pride themselves on knowing it all,  have ever heard of. It kills me because they are so good, so worth knowing about but their music is quite difficult to come by to this day so I guess that I shouldn't be completely shocked that remain a secret to this day.

Earwig as a trio are minimal but they still manage to be loud. They are filled with tension and energy but not in a predictable, overdriven theatrical way like Hole or Babes in Toyland. Think cool melodies ALA the Breeders or Velocity Girl but with an early electronic twist that remind me of modern day Morr Records artists like Lali Puna or  Ms. John Soda. I was inspired by Earwig  because they opened my ears to a new style of abstracted rage that that sounded completely fresh but even more importantly like something that with enough practice I might be able learn how to recreate on some level. I am terrible at naming all the band who have influenced me along the way as a musician but I can say with total confidence that Earwig is among that list. Even more exciting to me is that their songs still sound as important, beautiful, and raw as ever.

In fact, if by some stroke of dumb luck and ex member or friend to the band reads this I would kill to know more about the band and would seriously give my right arm to help reissue their catalog. (I have a small record label) These songs are too important to go unheard. I am totally serious. Calling all members of Earwig, I want to reissue you first three EPs. Pretty please? Pipe dream aside, it feels good to share a post about a band who has been important to me for not one but two decades.

Enjoy.